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Courses I teach:

TSOCW 502 – Human Behavior and the Social Environment I

Human Behavior and the Social Environment (HBSE) is a two-course sequence within the MSW foundation curriculum. HBSE I considers behavior as a function of biological, cognitive, psychological, cultural and social processes across the lifespan. Emphasis is placed upon both the individual and family development. The course stresses multi-cultural aspects of human development through examination of diverse ethnic and cultural backgrounds at different developmental stages. Also addressed will be the impact of life events and situations on different developmental stages.

This sequence focuses on both person and environment, utilizing developmental and social system perspectives to understand and influence human behavior. Developmental stages are examined across diverse backgrounds. Implications for social work practice and especially the assessment processes are highlighted. This course also introduces some of the theoretical frameworks commonly used in social work to address issues with clients.

TSOCW 503 – Human Behavior and the Social Environment II

This course focuses on the person-in-situation. Explores how to understand and influence human behavior through developmental and social system perspectives. Discusses the developmental stages across diverse backgrounds. Addresses the dynamics and processes of small group, family, organization, and community systems from a social system perspective as socializing forces and as targets of change. Examines implications for social work practice, especially the assessment process.

TSOCW 532 – Advanced Integrative Practice I

Advanced Integrative Practice I is the first of two practice courses in the Advanced Integrative Practice concentration. This course builds on the core framework and competencies acquired in the foundation classes, and is designed to prepare students for leadership roles in the design, implementation and evaluation of research-informed interventions and programs at the micro, mezzo and macro levels of practice. These interventions will focus on specific practice fields and modalities within the context of emerging societal conditions and needs. In the tradition of the social work profession, the prime motivator and ultimate goal of this curriculum is the realization of social and economic justice for those marginalized by society.

This course will draw from student-identified social justice change projects, peer-reviewed, stakeholder and population-specific information research techniques, instructor and participant practice experiences, reflective practice principles, and group discussions to provide an effective array of learning experiences.

TSOCW 533 – Advanced Integrative Practice II

This course is the second of two practice courses in the Advanced Integrative Practice Concentration. The advanced practice class sequence is designed to prepare students to assume leadership roles in the design, implementation and evaluation of research-informed interventions and programs at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels of practice. The course builds on the core framework and competencies acquired in the foundation curriculum.

This course focuses on the ethics, values, critical thinking and program development skills needed to design the intervention program researched in TSOCW 532. The intervention will focus on specific practice fields and modalities within the context of emerging societal conditions and needs. In the tradition of the social work profession, the prime motivator and ultimate goal of this advanced curriculum is the realization of social and economic justice for those marginalized by society. Students will also share their capstone projects with invited community members and the campus community at the Annual Social Work Capstone Fair to add to the disciplines’ knowledge.

TSOCWF 404 – Diversity and Social Justice

The purpose of this course is to explore human diversity and the nature of social justice. It will provide the conceptual, theoretical, and empirical knowledge base related to disadvantage, oppression, and empowerment.

The course content deals with sociopolitical patterns of power and privilege, and examines one’s accessibility to structures of socioeconomic opportunities so as to understand the marginalization, invisibility, and devaluation of some individuals based on their social group memberships (such as race, class, gender, sexuality, religion, language, and ability status). The course will provide an environment for students to explore their own values, beliefs, and behaviors and how these may affect future practice, especially with disadvantaged and oppressed populations. Utilizing self-awareness and knowledge about diverse groups in order to establish and sustain effective relationships and networks will be stressed throughout the course.

 

 

 

For descriptions of past courses taught click on the links below:

University of Washington, Tacoma

University of Minnesota

Metropolitan State University

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